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Painting the hull

Printed From: CONTESSA 32 ASSOCIATION
Category: Technical Help
Forum Name: Everything Else
Forum Discription: Problems or questions that do not fit in the above categories
URL: http://www.co32bb.org/forum_posts.asp?TID=282
Printed Date: 10 Dec 2018 at 3:45pm


Topic: Painting the hull
Posted By: James Chew
Subject: Painting the hull
Date Posted: 07 May 2012 at 10:11pm
Hi, I've just bout a 1970's Contessa still with the original paint on the topsides. It's looking a bit tired and I'd like to repaint but having never had a fibreglass boat before I have no idea how it's usually done. Is it possible to get a decent finish painting outside by hand?
 
Thanks in advance



Replies:
Posted By: St Paddy
Date Posted: 08 May 2012 at 8:16am
It is possible. If you spray you will have to tent in, you could take it to a yard with a tent.
If you hand paint then roll and tip
 
This is roll on the paint with a roller and then just use the tips of the  brush brissels to finish. Don't use a orbital sander to prep. as it will leave small flats and it will show when you have the gloss finish, you can't see it before. use a long board. Some one here I'm sure will tell you how to use it.
 
 


Posted By: michael.forrest
Date Posted: 08 May 2012 at 11:44am
Hi, Congrats on the new boat, I painted my old Contessa 26 outside in the summer on a dusty yard, the finish was good for my first effort and others complimented it. 

It's all in the preparation, as suggested don't use an orbital sander, i sanded off old paint down to gel coat and applied a coat of primer, about 3 coats of International Pre-coat sanded down to 300 grit i think followed by two coats of International Polyurethane Toplac rolled and then tipped off with a foam pad not a brush, i found this gave good results. 

As the yard was so dusty I soaked all of the ground around the boat before applying the finishing coats.  

International Paints have an excellent boat painting guide which can be downloaded here

http://www.yachtpaint.com/LiteratureCentre/1726%20BPG%2009_79%20Page_Online_UK.pdf

Good luck

Michael


Posted By: James Chew
Date Posted: 08 May 2012 at 12:12pm
Excellent, thank you both.
 
Is it ok to paint during the winter?


Posted By: St Paddy
Date Posted: 08 May 2012 at 4:20pm

Yes and no

You will need the filler to go off and the paint, so temperature of at least 10 degrees Epoxy needs 5 or it won't go off. You will need to consider humidity as well. It is possible to get blisters between pain layers. I have seen that once or twice only

Iit is possible to paint in the winter but slightly warmer is better, the sooner the pain is dry the less you will have stuck to it.


Posted By: George Isted
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 4:40pm

Hi James,

When you say that the boat has its original paint, do you mean it has its original gelcoat or has it been painted in the past?

If it's original gelcoat then I would have a go at polishing it up as even the most faded gelcoat can come up very well with a commercial polishing mop/machine.

If you do go down the paint route then roll and tip is certainly the way to go, I have painted a 15’ dinghy with International perfection using the roll and tip method with very good results.  Perfection is a 2-component paint that makes mixing a bit more complicated but the finish is super-hard and can then be polished if necessary.  If you can erect a temporary tent you will most likely get a much better finish when painting in a dirty boat yard.

 

 

Hope this helps a bit.



-------------
George Isted
www.solentboatbutler.co.uk
Contessa 32 "Concerto"
Co32 Class Measurer and ex Class Captain.


Posted By: James Chew
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 7:00pm
Thanks for the replies. Sorry, I was unclear - it's the original gelcoat and has never been painted.
I had a conversation with someone about this yesterday and he said that the gelcoat should never be painted, and that I would wipe half the value off the boat if I did. Is this correct?
 


Posted By: moongirl
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 7:35pm
I have had good results with a polish called Mer (available from good Auto Shops) and a buffing disk in an electric drill. Gets rid of marks particularly on white hulls.
I am not aware that repainting devalues the boat. A pro application of Awlgrip is usually stunning but of course a different colour will show through if you or someone else dings the hull!


-------------
COLIN


Posted By: doug
Date Posted: 09 May 2012 at 9:12pm
Undamaged gelcoat?
 
Think very carefully before you paint it  -  and then don't do it.


Posted By: St Paddy
Date Posted: 10 May 2012 at 8:07am

Before you paint try to fix the gelcoat. I do agree with Doug. I would not buy a painted boat, I had My CO26 sprayed and it looked stunning till my neighbour failed to moor properly and ruined it.

If it won't polish up use wet and dry 1200 then cut and polish. use a proper polisher and it runs slow use a wool mop.

See how you get on, I would expect it to come up well. I have similar problems on my deck as the gelcoat is thin. This starts a new topic do I regel. I have seen it and don't like it. I would rather do lots of local repairs.



Posted By: George Isted
Date Posted: 10 May 2012 at 9:59am
Originally posted by James Chew

Thanks for the replies. Sorry, I was unclear - it's the original gelcoat and has never been painted.
I had a conversation with someone about this yesterday and he said that the gelcoat should never be painted, and that I would wipe half the value off the boat if I did. Is this correct?
 
 

Only paint if absolutely necessary, hire/borrow/buy a professional polishing machine or pay someone to do it, you will be amazed at how good an old boat can come up with a good cut and polish.



-------------
George Isted
www.solentboatbutler.co.uk
Contessa 32 "Concerto"
Co32 Class Measurer and ex Class Captain.



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