CONTESSA 32 ASSOCIATION Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Technical Help > Mast, Rigging and Sails
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed: CO32 Nationals - Genoa usage
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Calendar   Register Register  Login Login

CO32 Nationals - Genoa usage

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
waratah912 View Drop Down
CO32 Members
CO32 Members


Joined: 17 Dec 2010
Location: Lymington
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 100
Post Options Post Options   Quote waratah912 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: CO32 Nationals - Genoa usage
    Posted: 01 Oct 2012 at 9:36pm
Unfortunately we were away for the weekend of the Nationals, but with such a wide range of wind conditions it would be interesting to know what genoa configurations were used by each boat - how many were using roller genoas? Were these used on Sunday or replaced by No 3/4? What about the light wind on Friday - did the roller users lose out to those with full No 1? 
Paul Smith
Waratah
Contact details available from the members only area
Back to Top
waratah912 View Drop Down
CO32 Members
CO32 Members


Joined: 17 Dec 2010
Location: Lymington
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 100
Post Options Post Options   Quote waratah912 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2012 at 3:10pm
It's a bit sad to have to respond to your own post, but there you go.
Looking at the picture gallery, it seems to me that :
- very few boats were using roller sails
- even some that had roller gear were using traditional sails
- those using roller gear did not feature among the top half of the results
anyone care to contradict? I could easily have missed something in the pictures  Confused
 
 
 
 
 
Paul Smith
Waratah
Contact details available from the members only area
Back to Top
George Isted View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 08 May 2009
Location: Solent
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 375
Post Options Post Options   Quote George Isted Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2012 at 4:03pm

I’m sorry that you have not had a response about this, Not all the racing folk visit for forum regularly I imagine.

 

To answer your question some were racing under the old rule and some under the new rule at the nationals.

 

Both Blanco and Drumbeat are racing under the “new” rule and are sailing with a very nice looking laminate headsails, however rather than using a furling system they have added a strop to the bottom of the sail to lift it up the required amount.  They finished 1st and 2nd overall.   Contessa Catherine was sailing with traditional sails and finished 3rd overall.  Most other boats sailed under the old (multiple headsail configuration) apart from L’Aquarelle and Gigi who both sailed with a furling genoa, however L’Aq has a dirty bum and Gigi was towing a fixed three-blade prop, both had a last-minute crew.

 

All in all I think it is difficult to come up with any conclusions from this other than there is far more to be gained or lost in a bad tack or mark rounding than there is in having one sail plan over the other.

 

The Poole passage race was interesting because there was a slightly different mix of boats (+ no Blanco and Drumbeat to dominate).  At least three (my own Concerto, L’Aquarelle and Tehani) were sailing with a furling genoa.  Concerto and Tehani both have a laminate genoa while L’Aquarelle has dacron.  Concerto (with 28.5 sqm laminate) and Alcyone (full size No1 Dacron genoa) and Carolina (full size No1 dacron genoa) had a really good drag race to the finish line for around 90 minutes, there was very little between the boats in terms of speed.  Concerto would lose out a little when the wind dropped but the genoa is a good bit smaller than the max size. 

 

I hope some of the other racing skippers post their thoughts.

George Isted
www.solentboatbutler.co.uk
Contessa 32 "Concerto"
Co32 Class Measurer and ex Class Captain.
Back to Top
George Isted View Drop Down
Moderator Group
Moderator Group
Avatar

Joined: 08 May 2009
Location: Solent
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 375
Post Options Post Options   Quote George Isted Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2012 at 4:07pm
This message was emailed by Ray Rouse of Blanco on the 7th Sept to a large number of racing skippers, I am sure that Ray will not mind me posting it here as the info is interesting to all....
 

Dear Racing Owner,

I am wondering if this might be an opportune time to let racing owners know of Blanco’s experience of a laminate genoa so far this season.

I attach a photo of Blanco’s laminate genoa, which we are particularly pleased with.  One can see how well it sets.  Although a little smaller than a full size Dacron No 1 genoa, because it retains such an efficient shape we have not felt at all underpowered in lighter winds.

This photo was taken on the Friday of Cowes Week, after a lot of rough treatment throughout this season and just two days after finishing a race in about 18 knots on a fetch when a prolonged gust of 35 knots true hit us.  The cover on the genoa halyard shredded in its Spinlock jammer, letting about 2m of the dyneema core through.  The genoa bolt rope then peeled down out of the head foil, setting the sail like a blooper, laying the boat over and scooping a lot of water into the sail.

Not the sort of loading the sail was designed for!  We did change down to a No 4 to finish the race in a full gale.

Certainly, I would expect a Dacron genoa to have ripped apart under such loading, or at best stretched beyond racing use.  I am impressed that this laminate sail now still sets so well, as if the incident had never happened.  I think this episode is a fantastic commendation for laminate sails.

Our laminate genoa also makes the boat much easier to crew and sail.  Because it does not stretch out of shape when under load, the wind range before having to change down is now significantly increased from about 16 knots to about 20 knots true.  Indeed, I have now concluded that for those who prefer to race without going to the expense of fitting a furler, two laminate genoas would more than adequately replace the old No’s 1, 2, and 3 Dacron headsails.  This will make the Contessa 32 a very attractive boat to race, with one less headsail to cope with.

However, we will not be in any hurry to replace our mainsail with a laminate one.  The Contessa main is a relatively small and little stressed part of the overall sail plan.  Blanco’s Dacron main is 6 years old now and it still sets beautifully.

A laminate genoa is a more expensive outlay than a Dacron one, but I am now convinced that laminate is far better value for money than Dacron for racing, both in terms of performance and longevity, and it is well worth the investment.

I am very much looking forward to the Nationals at Lymington in a couple of weeks’ time, and will be pleased to chat to any owner who is considering a laminate genoa if I can help.

Ray Rouse.

 

George Isted
www.solentboatbutler.co.uk
Contessa 32 "Concerto"
Co32 Class Measurer and ex Class Captain.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down